bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities
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bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities

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Published by Reference and Bibliographic [sic] Dept., University of Florida Libraries in cooperation with the Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida in Gainesville .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Caribbean Area

Subjects:

  • Caribbean Area -- Emigration and immigration -- Bibliography.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes index.

Statementcompiled and edited by Rosemary Brana-Shute with the assistance of Rosemarijn Hoefte.
SeriesBibliographic series ;, no. 9, Bibliographic series (Gainesville, Fla.) ;, no. 9.
ContributionsHoefte, Rosemarijn, 1959-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsZ7164.I3 B7 1983, JV7322 B7 1983
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiv, 339 p. ;
Number of Pages339
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3177328M
LC Control Number83019795

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bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities. Challenging the received wisdom that a dramatic growth in migration is undesirable, the book proposes new Author: Christine Swann. In his book, The Migration of Peoples from bibliography of Caribbean migration and Caribbean immigrant communities. Gainesville: University of Press of Florida. Conway, D. (, January). Migration in Caribbean immigrant communities. Gainesville: University of Press of Florida. In Search of a Better Life: Perspectives on Migration from the Caribbean (New York: Praeger Publishers, Palmer, Ransford. Pilgrims from the Sun: West Indian Migration to America.   This anthology represents important and original directions in the study of Caribbean migration. It takes a comparative perspective on the Caribbean people's migratory experiences to North America, Europe, and within the Caribbean. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the book discusses: * the causes of migration * the experiences of migrants.

Caribbean immigrants represent 10 percent of the million immigrants in the United States, with the vast majority coming from just five countries: Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Haiti, and Trinidad and Tobago. Depending on their origin country and period of arrival, immigrants from the Caribbean have varying skill levels, racial composition, language background, and motivations for. This anthology represents important and original directions in the study of Caribbean migration. It takes a comparative perspective on the Caribbean people's migratory experiences to North America, Europe, and within the Caribbean. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the book discusses: * the causes of migration * the experiences of migrants * the historical, cultural and political processes. This volume examines the phenomenon of mass population migration from the Caribbean to North America and the United Kingdom and the social, cultural, and economic adaptation of the immigrants to their new environments. A central theme of this volume is that twentieth century Caribbean migration is more than the migration of labor in search of jobs; it is also a movement of households and thus. Immigration from the Caribbean to the United States is a relatively recent phenomenon, beginning largely after This report provides a demographic profile of the million Caribbean immigrants in the United States: their geographic settlement, education and workforce characteristics, earnings, modes of entry, and more.

  As Latin American and Caribbean countries face a dual challenge—managing large-scale Venezuelan arrivals alongside the COVID pandemic—reliable data on the characteristics of newcomers are essential to policymaking. This MPI-IOM fact sheet offers a profile of refugees and migrants in 11 countries in the region, including their demographics, labor market participation, . "Creatively drawing on documentary sources and oral histories, Tinker offers invaluable insights into the social, political, and economic forces that have helped shape the history of West Indian migrations to the Bahamas--a country that has often been overlooked in Caribbean migration studies."--Frederick H. Smith, author of Caribbean Rum Although the Bahamas is geographically part of the West. This is a part of the series of four lectures on Dreams and a Special Destination: Fifty Years of Caribbean Migration to Britain, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the arrival of The SS Empire Windrush. Compared to other migrations from the Caribbean, the one to Britain has been marked by a perception of literary success and social, economical and political failure. Young Caribbean migrants & growing up in the UK. Little is known about the experiences of young Caribbean migrants and the children of migrants before the wave of large scale migration in the midth century. Written by Lemn Sissay 21/08/