Contaminants in herring gull eggs from the Great Lakes
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Contaminants in herring gull eggs from the Great Lakes 25 years of monitoring levels and effects by D. P. Ryckman

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Published by Environment Canada in Ottawa, Ont .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Water -- Pollution -- Great Lakes.,
  • Pollution -- Environmental aspects -- Great Lakes.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statement[authors: D.P. Ryckman, D.V. Chip Weseloh and C.A. Bishop].
SeriesGreat Lakes fact sheet
ContributionsBishop, C. A., Weseloh, D. V. Chip., Canada. Environment Canada.
The Physical Object
Pagination12 p. :
Number of Pages12
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20727855M
ISBN 100662255291
OCLC/WorldCa46542826

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Contaminants in herring gull eggs from the Great Lakes: 25 years of monitoring levels and effects / by D. P. Ryckman, D. V. Chip Weseloh and C. A. Bishop. Series title Great Lakes fact sheet. Changes in the concn of selected organochlorine contaminants (dieldrin, DDE (a breakdown product of DDT), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) in herring gull [Larus argentatus] eggs around the Great Lakes between and are described. Contaminants in herring gull eggs from the Great Lakes: 25 years of monitoring levels and effects / Authors: D.P. Ryckman, D.V. Chip Weseloh and C.A. Bishop. QL L3 R93 Life histories of North American shore birds. Abstract. The temporal trends () of 11 organochlorine contaminants in herring gull eggs from 13 colonies throughout the Great Lakes were statistically analyzed using two regression methods on logarithmically transformed data.

  The green-and-brown-flecked herring gull eggs contain growing concentrations of a new family of chemicals known as brominated diphenyl ethers, according to research by the Canadian Wildlife. Geographic and temporal trends in Great Lakes contamination were also elucidated. Analysis of herring gull tissues led to the identification of HAHs (mirex, photomirex, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorobenzenes, dioxins) previously undetected .   Check a Herring gull egg. Herring gulls, the larger of the two most common Great Lakes gull species, are less likely to nest in man-made habitats, like a waste water lagoon.   Herring gulls have therefore been the focus of the long‐term Great Lakes Herring Gull Monitoring Programme, spanning multiple colonies along the shores of the Great Lakes in Canada and the United States, with the objective of examining the concentrations and effects of environmental contaminants in herring gulls and their eggs.

The mean ratio of contaminant levels in great black‐backed gull eggs to contaminant levels in herring gull eggs for these three contaminants was (range of means, –). Predicted levels of contaminants in bald eagle eggs in Lake Ontario would be expected to be similar to the mean levels reported for great black‐backed gull eggs. Twenty years of temporal change in perfluoroalkyl sulfonate and carboxylate contaminants in herring gull eggs from the Laurentian Great Lakes † Wouter A. Gebbink,* ab Robert J. Letcher,* ab Craig E. Hebert a and D.V. Chip Weseloh c. We recently reported the discovery and identification of novel methoxylated polybrominated diphenoxybenzenes (MeO-PBDPBs) in herring gulls eggs from the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America. We presently investigated the temporal changes (–) in MeO-PBDPB concentrations and congener patterns, as well as chemical tracers of diet (ratios of carbon and nitrogen stable . As part of the Great Lakes Herring Gull Monitoring Program, the Canadian Wildlife Service has collected herring gull eggs for over 30 years to track the status and trends of legacy contaminants across the Great Lakes basin. More recent collections by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in partnership with Canada, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality and partners at Michigan State .